Back to Thailand

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Photos by MJ Klein, including food photos!

After our adventures in northern Laos, it was time to head back to Thailand.

Back To Thailand

We asked our friend Mr. Oath to meet us at the Thai/Lao border.  Since photography in the border zone is forbidden, I didn’t get any photos of him picking us up, and quite frankly I was so happy to see him after all that time that I totally forgot about taking any photos for the blog.  We got into his friend’s car and headed to Udon Thani.

Back To Thailand

We’ve been to Udon Thani before with our friend Mr. Banchob, but we haven’t spent significant time there.  We’ve heard others talk about Udon and what a nice place it is, so we were looking forward to finding out for ourselves.  Mr. Oath took us to an outdoor food pavilion.  This is just one of the seating areas.

Back To Thailand

Surrounding the seating area, are literally dozens of food vendors with a wide variety of foods.

Back To Thailand

Everything that I saw looked fresh and top-notch.

Back To Thailand

Back To Thailand

Just look at this Thai salad (som tom).  This salad rocked!

Back To Thailand

I had to get a plate of famous Isaan sausages!

Back To Thailand

Some chicken nugget type things.

Back To Thailand

Thai style fried rice.

Back To Thailand

This is a shot of the destruction we left!  Not shown is the small bottle of Sang Som and mixer that we drank with dinner.

Back To Thailand

After we finished eating we took a walk in the nearby complex.  This is a huge, perpetual night market area, with a wide variety of items for sale, just like the food.

Back To Thailand

That’s Hui-chen in the pink shirt, and Mr. Oath up ahead in the white shirt.

Back To Thailand

Many vendors lay their products on the ground to display them.

Back To Thailand

Others use racks to hang their clothing along the path.

Back To Thailand

Back To Thailand

We found out that this area is called the “walking street” of Udon Thani.  Notice the misspelling of the word “bazaar.”  That’s ok, we got the meaning!

Back To Thailand

This is the same sign in Thai.  The word “soi” means “road” in Thai.

Back To Thailand

One of those huge outdoor places that Thailand is famous for.

Back To Thailand

Here were are, walking along the outskirts of the Bazaar.  We’re heading to another place after this.

Back To Thailand

Lately, it seems like more and more places are being lit up by LEDs as the technology becomes less and less expensive.

Back To Thailand

Mr. Oath took us to another place with live music.  We ordered some snack food of course!

Back To Thailand

This was a rather strange dish, but I must say that it was good.  It kinda tasted like “kung pao” shrimp but not as hotly spiced.  The bowl was edible too.

Back To Thailand

These are deep fried shrimp.

Back To Thailand

Of course, Thai peanuts which are always fantastic.

Back To Thailand

This is our last shot for you of the evening.  This is one of the promotional girls who’s job it is to try to get you to buy more of whatever kind of alcohol she is selling.  She was hanging around us all evening so I had to take a shot of her.  I’ve since forgotten what it was she was selling.  Oh well, it doesn’t matter.  We had a great time catching up with Mr. Oath.  It was good being back in Thailand again.

The next article is about our last day in Thailand before we go home to Taiwan.  You don’t want to miss that one because we show Michael Cannon the hidden market of Khonkaen.

Thanks for reading!  We want your comments, recommendations and retweets!  Don’t be shy now!

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12 comments

  1. Pingback: MJ Klein
    1. hi Mike. they are ordinary peanuts, cooked in an ordinary manner. Thai (and Taiwanese) peanut products are very good, that’s all. for some reason they taste like they have more of that peanut taste that we all love. that’s it! take care Mike.

      1. Hmmmm… will have to see if I can find some in this area to try.

        Mid June (I think the 13th) will be the Hong Kong Dragon Boat Festival in Boston and there are usually some Thai vendors there. So I’ll have to see if any of them have any. I did try I think some Thai rice last year which was pretty good.
        .-= mike01905´s last blog ..2010 World of Wheels in Boston =-.

        1. Mike, if you do find some Thai vendors, i wouldn’t expect that they have peanuts imported from Thailand. their fare is most likely made from local ingredients.

  2. Pingback: Patrick Cowsill
  3. Greasy and spicy Thai food? It’s making me hungry. “This is one of the promotional girls who’s job it is to try to get you to buy more of whatever kind of alcohol she is selling. I’ve since forgotten what it was she was selling.” Had a bit too much to drink of it, huh?

    1. nah, i didn’t drink much at all. i just didn’t pay much attention to what she was selling. it was probably that Dutch beer i hate.

  4. I don’t care for it either. It tastes like lemonade. Somebody ought to blog about why it’s so popular in Taiwan. I’d guess it has something to do with status.

  5. Northeastern Thailand (Isaan) is the place to go to see the real Thailand. I love it in this part of the country and have retired in Khon Kaen.

    1. do you have a name? i’ve probably seen you around Khonkaen. we thought about buying a house there, but Thailand and the Thai baht is too unstable. i spent considerable time there developing products only to see the baht shift and my profit evaporate. it’s a nice place to visit, etc., etc.

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