Hsinchu Night Shots

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Photos by MJ Klein

It’s been some time since we featured some night shots, so we’re long overdue.  I really enjoy shooting at night and since I have the optically stabilized lens I can usually get good results in low-lighting conditions.

Hsinchu Night Shots

This is a food area, with lots of places to eat.  We found a place and had dinner (but I didn’t take any photos of the food).

Hsinchu Night Shots

I love taking walking-around photos like this.

Hsinchu Night Shots

This street has so much activity, it really comes alive at night.

Hsinchu Night Shots

This is a zoomed shot of the above photo.

Hsinchu Night Shots

This part of Hsinchu has a lot of very old buildings and yes I like to shoot old buildings very much.

Hsinchu Night Shots

Notice that the rafters are wooden.  You don’t see that very often anymore.

Hsinchu Night Shots

Hsinchu Night Shots

A couple of older building fronts.

Hsinchu Night Shots

We saw this shop offering stone teapots.  Many prices on these teapots were over 30,000 NT dollars.

We hope to bring you more night shots soon!  Thanks for reading!

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26 comments

  1. MJ. I hope to have my IS lens soon. The money is nearly saved up, nearly lol. The Canon image stabiliser lens is going to be really welcomed when I get it.

    Great shots, are these old buildings protected like back home, like heritage listed and cannot be altered.

    Some of the old Blue Stone building back home were works of art. They have stood the test of time and will well after I have gone not like buildings of today.
    .-= Brunty´s last blog ..Rebecca Wilson, Australian Journalist and Radio Big Mouth. =-.

    1. Brunty, you’re going to love IS shooting. i’m not sure about these buildings, but in some other cities such as Dasi (we’ve blogged on that place before) the buildings are protected, and you cannot alter the fascia at all. in certain places, the government is trying to protect the heritage and the buildings are protected. it wouldn’t surprise me if these particular ones are, but i can’t say for sure. some of the old buildings are amazing, and as you said, they stand the test of time. thanks Brunty.

    2. Canon have just announced a new type of hybrid IS that compensates for both linear and rotational shake, which will be the first lens system to do this. Google “Canon hybrid IS” and there is plenty of info to be found. I haven’t read too much more about it so can’t really offer extra advice. It’ll be released later this year – Brunty, you might want to wait a bit longer before buying and get one of these new ones.
      .-= Craig Ferguson (@cfimages)´s last blog ..Five For Friday – Noel Gallagher =-.

  2. Dennis, technically, that isn’t a night market. I know, because I live in Hsinchu City. A night market is outdoors, and most of this one isn’t. Most of it is indoors, adjoining a temple just off Zhongshan Road. The food stands are just that: food stands. The place is more of a food mall than anything else. I have a feeling (which keeps being substantiated, since all the areas in the city, from Tsing Hua University to the North District to Xiangshan don’t have any night markets) that night markets aren’t really allowed in Hsinchu City.

    There are two places where there are markets, which mostly occur in the afternoon or night. However, again, these aren’t technically night markets. The two markets are behind the Stadium just off Gongyuan Road (near Guangfu Road). This market sells at lot of plants. In fact, half of the merchandise is made up of house plants. This is my favourite market.

    The other market is under the Dongda overpass. This is under the overpass – the one that starts at the corner of Dongda and Nanda Roads. I haven’t been in this market. And it is literally IN. You have to keep going for two blocks next to – but not on – the overpass to get to it.

    Both of these markets are corralled in such a way as they are out of view of regular traffic. Which is sensible, if less colourful.

    There might be night markets in Nanliao, but I’m not sure. MJ might know more about this. I actually consider Zhubei to be more part of Hsinchu City than Nanliao. If we built an MRT here, if god-willing does happen, then there would be several stops in Zhubei, but none to speak of in Nanliao. It doesn’t have enough going for it to merit a metro stop.
    .-= Thoth Harris´s last blog ..The Disharmony of Various Difractions, Fractions, and Factions, and How They Don’t Affect Us… =-.

    1. Mike, night photography is one of my favorite themes. it’s been awhile since i did any. i need to get out more at night with my camera. thanks.

      1. Well back in April… I went to a Red Sox game and posted some pics on Flickr. You commented on how the Budweiser signed looked out in right field (even tho the game was during the day and no lit up).

        Well Tuesday night (Wednesday morning your time)… I should be in Fenway Park again. This time I’ll get pics of both the Coke~Cola (left field side) and Budweiser signs lit up.

        Going Tuesday night for 2 reasons…. 1) Jim Rice is going into the baseball hall of fame this weekend and on Tuesday night the Red Sox are retiring his number and 2) its my brthday 🙂
        .-= mike01905´s last blog ..2009 New England Sand Sculpting Festival at Revere Beach =-.

        1. Mike, yeah i remember how vivid the red sign was with the jacked up colors. Jim Rice – man i remember him. seems he was the laziest player i ever saw. btw, how old are you now? (you might want to email that info!).

          1. Well… I figured at night… both the red Budweiser and red Coke~Cola sign should look pretty nice. Hopefully they’ll look good… even with all of the other lights at Fenway on.

            How old am I??? I don’t have anything to hide from anyone. Right now I’m 42. In a couple of days (Tuesday the 28th) I’ll be 43.
            .-= mike01905´s last blog ..2009 New England Sand Sculpting Festival at Revere Beach =-.

  3. Michael, Nanliao is the beach that is to the West of Jhubei and Hsinchu City. The easiest way to get there (and to get to one of the oft-touted tourist destinations, equivalent to the Fishemernan’s Wharf in San Fran) is via Dongda Road. Where Dondga Road nears the oceanside, you’ll see a lot of seafood restaurants.
    But if you keep going even further, you are in Nanliao. I haven’t seen downtown Nanliao, but your remark about not even known where/what Nanliao is kind of proves my point that the town is not a particularly notable example of a “bedroom community” of Hsinchu City. Jhubei, and even Jhudong, however are notable, although I doubt there would be very much wisdom in building a metro stop in the latter town, whereas the former would make more sense.

    By the way, MJ, it goes without saying, but your night photos in this post are amazing! It is just like I am seeing the scene with my own eyes. Goodness knows, you have to have a good shutter, lens (and by extension, a good camera). Of course, having a good eye is indispensable as well.
    .-= Thoth Harris´s last blog ..The Disharmony of Various Difractions, Fractions, and Factions, and How They Don’t Affect Us… =-.

    1. Thoth, my wife explained where it is. we’ve been there several times, including one time with David Reid at the Dragon Boat Festival.

      thanks for your kind comments about my night photos. i used an optically stabilized Sigma lens and it makes quite a difference! take care.

        1. Read the article on taking pics at night… and also read the article on taking pics of fireworks.

          I always thought at night you had to kick up the ISO like I did when taking pics of the tall ship Libertad leaving Boston Harbor (first pics you had light from the setting sun but as it reached Castle Island you lost that light).

          Also… what is your opinon… and Craig’s opinion… of “monopods”?? I know some people that love them (including some professional photographers)… but to me you could still have some camera shake as you can still move the camera left/right and forward/backward. I personally think/feel a tripod would be better than a monopod.

          1. Mike, the Nikons are auto-ISO, and they can adjust the ISO setting to suit the scene being photographed. my D80 can vary the ISO up to 1,600. i’ve never used a monopod but i think it would be useful sometimes. for me, carrying around a tripod (and i’ve done it) is a major thrash. but a monopod is more like a hiking stick.

          2. My Sony has Auto-ISO as well… but since most of the pics when the Tall Ships were leaving Boston were taking during the bright sunny day… I had it set to 100 and then I increased I think for the last 2 ships (because of the time of day and lighting). I think I can put the ISO up to 3200 on my two Sony cameras.

            I’ve seen some monopods advertised as having a certain type of “tip” at the end of it so that it could double as a hiking stick.

            Sure… if hiking and having a monopod with you would be better than carrying a tripod with you. But for everyday picture taking… I would just think that a tripod would be better than a monopod. With a tripod… your camera is perfectly still. With a monopod… it won’t move up or down any… but depending on how steady (or not steady) your hand/arm is… you could have front to back or side to side movement.
            .-= mike01905´s last blog ..2009 New England Sand Sculpting Festival at Revere Beach =-.

          3. Mike, the D80 has manual ISO to 3,200, but the auto-iso feature works up to 1,600. later models, like the D300 can auto iso up to 6,400.

            remember when using a tripod you also have to use the self timer to avoid the shake from pushing the button.

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