Beautiful Wulai, Part I

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Photos by MJ Klein

Hui-chen and I took a little sight-seeing trip to Wulai after our return from China recently.  If you haven’t been there in awhile, you should take a visit and see for yourself, what a lovely place Wulai really is.

Wulai Visit
Besides the famous waterfall, Wulai is known for these emerald green waters (and wires!).  These photos are un-processed and the colors are just how the Nikon D80 photographed them.

Wulai Visit
We’ve been to Wulai a couple of times, but the sun wasn’t out on any of those occasions.  Fortunately the colors are so vivid that even when overcast, Wulai sports some great photo opportunities.

Wulai Visit
Ideally, one would park their car in the main lot and walk up into and through the downtown area.  Like many recently renovated downtown areas in Taiwan small towns, Wulai is dedicated to tourists.  Although I normally do not like this kind of area, for some reason Wulai is able to pull it off with some grace.  If you are a “foreigner” however, you can expect the usual pandering from the vendors, so just take it in stride.  There are plenty to choose from!

Wulai Visit
Along the route to the downtown you will find various hot springs resorts.  We’ve never stayed in one of these places in the downtown area (nearby though) but from the street they looked pretty good and the prices are competitive.   You just have to deal with the stupid way people hard sell in Asia.

Wulai Visit
Wulai is known for quaint scenery like this.  You can get a room with a view on the river and relax in a hot spring tub.

Check out the varieties of food available from street vendors:

Wulai Visit

Wulai Visit

Wulai Visit
There are varieties of “mountain pig” pretty much everywhere.  Even mountain goat.  The smells wafting about are great.
Wulai Visit
Hui-chen went shopping for shoes.  She got a couple pair of really cute ones.   The Indian boss spoke Chinese very well.

Wulai Visit

Wulai Visit

Wulai Visit
This guy is pulling taffy.  He had to move very quickly to keep it off the street.  Once it went into the bucket, they were all over me to try pounding it.  I don’t blend in very well.

Wulai Visit
Hui-chen is enjoying some kind of taro snack.  The crowds were thick on Sunday.  Next time we’re going back on a weekday.

Wulai Visit
I snapped this shot of all the fresh meat you can get grilled to order.

Wulai Visit
As you walk across the bridge you can see people out on the banks.  Sometimes they party out there.  Sounds like a great time to me!

Wulai Visit

Wulai Visit

Wulai Visit

Wulai Visit

Walking through the throngs of visitors and vendors is well worth the scenic beauty of Wulai.  But there is a lot more to this lovely place and we’ll cover that in Part II!

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19 comments

  1. Wow … awesome colors and eqally great reporting MJ. I would love to get there and spend some nice time. I desparately need that kind of relaxation. and I gotta see that Indian boss. Haven’t met any indian so far who speaks chinese. I am happy to know that you are back to your normal self and exploring and bringing real taiwan to us.

    Ashish’s last blog post..Uncluttered?

  2. Wulai looks really lovely. Even though I was just in Taiwan in September, I want to go back again! There are so many more places I want to visit. I miss the food so much!

    Sandy’s last blog post..Venice versus Venice

    1. Sandy » that’s the problem with Taiwan – as soon as you leave you want to come back! it’s a real problem for us when we travel because sometimes the scenery isn’t as good, and neither is the food! come back soon Sandy!

    1. Brunty » Wulai is on our list of places to take you when you come visit Taiwan. KLM airlines, 8,000 Baht, hey what are you waiting for? 🙂

  3. I have very fond memories of Wulai myself, having proposed to my wife there. 🙂 I also remember all the wires across the river – it seems very counter-intuitive for such a touristy spot, to spoil the view with so many cables. What puzzled me was that the mayor wouldn’t take initiative and clean that up – shouldn’t be a lot of effort to run the cables along the bridge and hide them from view. Admittedly that could easily explained by incompetence or inertia. Picky foreigners get annoyed over things which the Taiwanese can’t even see.

    However the next thing that puzzled me: why are there so many in the first place? Even if people don’t care about the view – cables like these are not that cheap either – why aren’t they run to the neighbouring houses on the same side of the river?

    1. StefanMuc » i think it’s because each person just ran their own wire where they needed it to be. so there isn’t a community effort; it’s an individual effort and no one notices what anyone else does. the wires themselves are part of the attraction by now i think. people (foreigners) stare at them in wonderment.

  4. Gorgeous photos MJ. You’ve really out-done yourself. You kept us all waiting and then hit us up with a terrific series. Talk about a comeback!

    Carrie’s last blog post..Bumble Me

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